24 August 2013

GM Car Production UK: 1996 - 2012

Looking at a list like this, you can see how GM Europe operates, that is with short term policies. GM Vauxhall is a popular brand in the UK, but GM decided to cut back to one model by 2005. I struggle to see how consistent profit can be made, with model cycles as they are, even with flexible labour options in the UK. By that I mean not too hard to lay workers off.

Still, GM knows it needs a manufacturing presence in the UK with the loyalty UK buyers show it's cars and therefore the importance of the UK to GM Europe.

Below we see the Astra as the stable element in the time from '96, with the Vectra a valauble contributor to production numbers when it was made at Luton. The Frontera SUV was solid if unspectacular and the Speedster was made by Lotus for GM.


Yr Total Astra Vectra Frontera Speedst

96 297,700 112,400 155,800 29,500 -

97 284,500 102,000 157,500 25,000 -

98 277,300 98,200 154,500 24,600 -

99 339,000 154,700 145,600 38,700 -

00 290,800 154,100 103,100 33,500 100

01 193,700 132,300 51,400 7,000 3,000

02 138,500 48,300 75,300 13,000 1,900

03 133,600 30,300 92,600 9,500 1,200

04 146,900 126,000 20,400 - 500

05 189,400 189,200 - - 200

06 143,700 143,700 - - -

07 115,500 115,500 - - -

08 102,500 102,500 - - -

09 76,700 76,700 - - -

10 102,700 102,700 - - -

11 138,000 138,000 - - -

12 90,200 90,200 - - -

Av 180,041 112,753 106,244 22,600 1,150

22 August 2013

Ford UK Car Production 1968 - 1978

I posted Ford car production from 1979-1992 a while back, which you can see by clicking here. I have now found data for the previous eleven years.

The Cortina and Escort were the mainstay of production for this period, with others in a supporting role.

The Capri came and went in this time, proving to be a popular car for a niche segment.

The Granada / Consul didn't last long in UK production as it was soon transferred to Germany. I presume numbers didn't justify two plants making them.

The MK IV Zephyr / Zodiac was not that popular looking at those production numbers (I had a nice Dinky car of the latter though), and the Corsair was on the way out by the late 60's. Just over 300,000 in total were made of the latter.

Yr Total Cortina Escort Fiesta Capri Gr/Con Ze/Zod Corsair
68 486,500 261,800 161,700 - 3,100 - 24,700 35,200
69 524,000 265,900 145,000 - 79,600 - 19,900 13,600
70 450,600 195,400 156,700 - 69,200 - 18,900 10,400
71 368,500 182,200 128,400 - 41,100 - 16,800 -
72 546,700 264,200 198,900 - 46,700 36,900 - -
73 453,400 220,100 147,300 - 49,400 36,600 - -
74 383,700 186,300 138,900 - 37,300 21,200 - -
75 329,600 140,400 152,500 - 21,200 15,500 - -
76 383,200 146,400 188,300 8,200 27,000 13,300 - -
77 406,600 168,500 177,600 60,500 - - - -
78 324,400 152,100 133,100 39,200 - - - -

19 August 2013

The UK DHL Issue


I know you cannot tell a full story about anything that appears in the media. After all, the media slogan about 'never letting the truth get in the way of a good story' still applies as much as ever. However, assuming the media have reported accurately on the following story, I will pass an opinion.

Reported: That workers who deliver parts to Jaguar / Land Rover plants in the UK work for the logistics firm DHL. The delivery people want parity in pay with those who actually assemble the cars. This would mean a 12.8% and 20.6% increase in wages over the next two years for delivery personnel and drivers respectively. DHL has offered a 4.5% increase in January 2014 and a 3% the following year. A disruption to JLR production now seems inevitable.

Opinion: I think this is about JLR being successful and delivery workers wanting a slice of the good pay rates enjoyed by JLR workers. Still, why should someone delivering a car part assume they are deserving the same pay rate as the workers on the production line?

Problem: DHL isn't JLR, and the pay rise it is offering seams reasonable. Disruption to JLR production, something the unions feel will give leverage (back to the bad old days?) Greed had gripped DHL workers.

Solution: If DHL workers don't like their pay, they can go and find another job, which pays according to the value of their inflated egos. (They do a modestly skilled job, and probably why they haven't gone elsewhere).

Ideal outcome: DHL workers regain their common sense and take what DHL is offering, or go away and then are replaced by people deserving of regular, soundly paid employment.

PS. Assuming all that the media have reported is correct.